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The Festival of Britain crystallised British identity in 1951. BritainÂ’s place in the world had changed drammatically since the Great Exhibition of 1851: the economy was in ruins; the Empire was disintegrating (India won independence in 1948, for example); BritainÂ’s influence in the world was declining, national identity was being altered by mass immigration from former British colonies.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +18 votes | 4 comments
The Great Exhibition was an international trade fair that took place in 1851. It was organised by Henry Cole and Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria. The most industrially advanced nations and their empires participated, making the 'Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nations' the largest exhibition ever held, its scope eclipsing all previous exhibitions.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +13 votes | 3 comments
James Gibbs (1682-1754) was a Scottish architect of the Georgian period. A Roman Catholic, he studied in Rome under the Papal Architect Carlo Fontana. His first major work was the church of St Mary-le-Strand and displays a strong Italian Baroque influence. His later commissions include St Martin-in-the-Fields, the Radcliffe Camera at Oxford and the Senate House at Cambridge.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +10 votes | 3 comments
The Great Exhibition was an international trade fair that took place in 1851. It was organised by Henry Cole and Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +13 votes | 7 comments
Whitechapel Art Gallery in London is a superb late Victorian building designed by Charles Harrison Townsend (1851-1928), a brilliantly original architect who became a pioneer of the Edwardian Free Style.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +14 votes | 1 comments
Throughout 20th century, reinforced concrete played an essential role in changing the thinking of architects and civil engineers and allowed new opportunities to create daring building masses, shapes and forms.
Published by Abdel-moniem El-Shorbagy 74 months ago in Architecture | +29 votes | 15 comments
Towards the end of the nineteenth century anxieties about the nature of urban space were becoming widespread. Across Europe suspicions arose about the safety, hygiene and moral integrity of the city. The building of shopping arcades was a response to these anxieties, an attempt to regulate and sanitise urban space.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +12 votes | 4 comments
In 1978, a Feminist design collective called Matrix was established in London. Matrix consisted of a number of women architects who were trying to challenge the ‘man-made environment’, which they saw as a physical manifestation of patriarchy.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +9 votes | 2 comments
Georg Simmel’s essay ‘The Metropolis and Mental Life’ (1903) viewed the city as the arena of modernity, a disorientating realm that generated neuroses such as agoraphobia and claustrophobia. Exploring the metropolis as a psychological construction, Simmel contended that the city harboured a nervous and feverish population plagued with alienation and a sense of dislocation.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +9 votes | 3 comments
Urban space has been studied by a range of academic disciplines from geography to architectural history. This article explores some lesser known approaches to the study of the built environment.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +9 votes | 3 comments
There is a substantial body of literature on the Victorian city and nineteenth-century civic culture. A foundation was provided by H.J. Dyos and M. WolfeÂ’s The Victorian City: Images and Realities (1973). Manchester was examined in J.H.G. ArcherÂ’s Art and Architecture in Victorian Manchester (1985) and A.J. Kidd and K.W. RobertsÂ’s City, Class and Culture: Studies of cultural production and social policy in Victorian Manchester (1985).
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +4 votes | 1 comments
The Queen Anne style re-emerged as part of the Domestic Revival in English architecture. The red brick houses of Norman Shaw, J.J. Stevenson and others were a response to the lack of picturesque architecture in London. These architects developed a style that stepped deftly between ponderous Victorian Classicism and the dogmatic Gothic Revival.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +13 votes | 4 comments
J.T. Cackett (1860-1928) was born in West Hartlepool and educated at the Royal Grammar School, Newcastle. He then went to the Academy in Greenock, taking classes in Art and Science.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +8 votes | 1 comments
Washington Old Hall is a picturesque stone manor house lying at the heart of historic Washington village. The building incorporates parts of the original medieval home of George Washington's direct ancestors.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +8 votes | 3 comments
Ken Adam is a legendary production designer who coordinated the visual style of some of the most popular and influential films in the history of cinema. He was responsible for the Pentagon War Room set in Dr. Strangelove, the gadget-laden Aston Martin DB5 in Goldfinger, and the twisted Gothic mansion in Adams Family Values.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +8 votes | 0 comments
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