Architecture Articles - Page 9 — Knoji
Airfare Daily Deals eCigarettes Eyeglasses Hotels Jewelry Online Backup Online Dating Online Printing Online Tickets Skin Care Textbook Rentals Vitamins Web Hosting Weddings
Find thousands of shopping-related forums
SEARCH
Q&A
Get true answers from experts in Architecture.
Thomas Austin was born on 17 October 1822 at Haughton-le-Skerne. He was the eldest son of the Reverend Thomas Austin MA, Rector of Redmarshall in County Durham.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +11 votes | 3 comments
The strange apparition below is a bizarre decoration on the façade of the Cathedral Buildings in Newcastle Upon Tyne. Also known as the 'Vampire Rabbit', the grotesque creature can be found above an ornate doorway at the rear of the building.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +12 votes | 5 comments
Of all the primary sources available to researchers, perhaps none are more vivid than archival photographs. Photographs provide a window into the past and offer a wealth of fascinating detail. They can be used to reconstruct major historic events and to recapture the vibrant urban culture of towns and cities.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +9 votes | 2 comments
Modernism was also used to create new corporate identities. Two key institutions took Modernism up with enthusiasm: London Transport and the British Broadcasting Corporation.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +15 votes | 8 comments
The late Victorian architect Sir Ernest George (1839-1922) was a leader of the English Domestic Revival and the pre-eminent designer of crematoria in Britain. George was celebrated during his lifetime, but his subsequent reputation has been eclipsed by contemporaries such as Norman Shaw.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +16 votes | 14 comments
Modernism was a revolution which, theoretically at least, put the masses into design. Germany became the meeting place for experimental attempts to unite Art and Technology.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +17 votes | 7 comments
IKEA is a major cultural phenomenon and as a result it has featured in a number of film and TV productions. These give an indication of how the company is perceived and the place it occupies within our society.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +12 votes | 3 comments
The notorious architectural style known as Brutalism grew out of the rigorous principles of European Modernism and dominated British architecture in the 1950s and 60s. Brutalism gave us the 1960s tower blocks and estates that are now so unpopular with the public.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +12 votes | 4 comments
The 20th century was transformed by industrialisation and rapid technological progress. Society was changed to such an extent that people were conscious of living in a ‘modern age.’ For this reason artists and designers began to feel that a more forward-looking style was needed.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +18 votes | 6 comments
During the Industrial Revolution Britain became the worldÂ’s first industrial power. Most progressive artists and designers were appalled by the effects of industry. Many of them joined the Arts and Crafts movement, which is BritainÂ’s most important contribution to the history of design. The leader of the Arts and Crafts movement was William Morris (1834-1896), who was a writer, designer and social reformer. He was a radical who questioned the values of his day.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +22 votes | 13 comments
In Britain there is a well known maxim that 'An Englishman's home is his castle'. This is derived from an ancient right to refuse forced entry into oneÂ’s house but it has become axiomatic of the importance of the home, the private domestic sphere, within British culture.
Published by MJ5446 74 months ago in Architecture | +18 votes | 10 comments
The advent of the machine and mass-production had such revolutionary significance for the early twentieth-century that this era came to be known as the Machine Age. Among the great number of cultural changes engendered by this new age was the adoption of a ‘machine aesthetic’ in art and design.
Published by MJ5446 75 months ago in Architecture | +11 votes | 1 comments
The Festival of Britain was a national exhibition held in London in May 1951. It provides a snapshot of Britain in the mid 20th century.
Published by MJ5446 75 months ago in Architecture | +15 votes | 7 comments
In the 19th century, public baths and washhouses were built across Britain. We think of washing, maintaining the cleanliness of oneÂ’s own body, as a private act, but it became a major public concern in the Victorian era. Public baths were buildings that allowed BritainÂ’s urban populace to perform a private function in the interest of public health.
Published by MJ5446 75 months ago in Architecture | +19 votes | 3 comments
Public houses are a form of drinking establishment that has been at the centre of British life for centuries. Britain has thousands of public houses, or pubs as theyÂ’re usually known. Some lie at the heart of rural villages; others are nestled in the streets of towns and cities.
Published by MJ5446 75 months ago in Architecture | +18 votes | 13 comments
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 >>